Working Weight

One of the hardest things for me about being on the road is food. I love food. I love reading about it, I love cooking it, and I love eating it. As with anything, this has its ups and downs. Yes, it can lead to some wonderful experiences and even better memories. But add some health-consciousness (see also: vanity), subtract a kitchen and a regular schedule, and you've got a recipe for mayhem on the road. It should come as no surprise to you, though for some reason it did to me, that learning how to travel constantly and not put on weight is a very challenging task. Pros:

  • There's almost always a new, interesting place to find food
  • Travel stipends allow you to make sure you are getting decent quality and generally afford you the ability to be mindful of your meals
  • Making your way to a restaurant you've Yelp'd can be a great way to explore the area you're in (and find more places to eat later)
  • New and exciting meals can be great for getting to know your team better and take a load off (miss you, Thursday Rodney's nights)

Cons:

  • You often don't know exactly what's in your food, if you have any vague idea at all
  • You usually eat more in a restaurant than you do at home, via bread to startside of friesthe insanely delicious-looking dessert special, what have you
  • Temptation is everywhere. Ev.Ry.Where. See point above
  • If you're with a team, you have to **gasp** compromise. And be a team player. And sometimes that means getting Subway or Outback or Quizno's (the horror!) and you have to just suck it up and deal

As with everything, there's always a - get ready to roll your eyes at me - balance to be struck. And while you can pick up a few general rules of thumb along the way, you'll probably have to rebalance in every new city, and with every new team.

Keep an eye out for upcoming posts about what I've found works, what doesn't, and when I screw something up. And if you have something to add, please do! Clearly I have more than my fair share to learn.

Cheers,

Sig